Keynote and Invited Speaker

Keynote speaker

   Edward E. Lee (University of California at Berkeley)                  http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu/~eal/images/eal04.JPG

Title: The Internet of Important Things


Abstract: 
Cyber-physical systems are integrations of computation, communication networks, and physical dynamics. Applications include manufacturing, transportation, energy production and distribution, biomedical, smart buildings, and military systems, to name a few. Increasingly, today, such systems leverage Internet technology, despite a significant mismatch in technical objectives. A major challenge today is to make this technology reliable, predictable, and controllable enough for "important" things, such as safety-critical and mission-critical systems. The dominant concerns with Web and Cloud technology are scalability, robustness, and reasonable response times.  When physical processes are involved, however, timeliness becomes less of a performance metric, and more of a correctness criterion, and safety becomes a central concern. In this talk, I argue that the engineering models predominantly used for software, and particularly for distributed software, are not well suited to the CPS context. I will examine an alternative view of the CPS design problem that focuses on deterministic models for distributed cyber-physical systems.

About the speaker:
Edward A. Lee is the Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) department at U.C. Berkeley. His research interests center on design, modeling, and analysis of embedded, real-time computational systems. He is the director of the nine-university TerraSwarm Research Center (http://terraswarm.org), a director of Chess, the Berkeley Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems, and the director of the Berkeley Ptolemy project. From 2005-2008, he served as chair of the EE Division and then chair of the EECS Department at UC Berkeley. He is co-author of six books and hundreds of papers. He has led the development of several influential open-source software packages, notably Ptolemy and its various spinoffs. He received the B.S. degree in Computer Science from Yale University in 1979, the S.M. degree in EECS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1981, and the Ph.D. degree in EECS from UC Berkeley in 1986. From 1979 to 1982 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, in the Advanced Data Communications Laboratory. He is a co-founder of BDTI, Inc., where he is currently a Senior Technical Advisor, and has consulted for a number of other companies. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, was an NSF Presidential Young Investigator, and won the 1997 Frederick Emmons Terman Award for Engineering Education.

 


Björn B. Brandenburg: Quo vadis, RTOS? A Look at the Design of Present and Future Real-Time Operating Systems for the Multicore Age

Abstract:

With the advent of the multicore age, real-time operating system (RTOS) developers are faced with the challenge of having to fundamentally rethink the design of their systems. How to "best" schedule the (increasingly many) available cores? How to enable efficient inter-core synchronization? What about tradeoffs in predictability, flexibility, and performance? More often than not, the "best practices" and design choices made in uniprocessor systems (and codified in RTOS standards) are ill-suited for multicore platforms. In response, the real-time literature has accumulated a bewildering array of new potential solutions — including numerous proposals for global, clustered, partitioned, and semi-partitioned scheduling approaches and various suspension- and spin-based locking protocols, to name just a few categories. However, the right choice in practice is often far from obvious, owing both to the intricate interplay of analytical and engineering concerns in a typical RTOS, and to a not insignificant gap between theory and practice in the real-time literature. Fortunately, research in the past decade has illuminated many of these issues and a clearer picture has emerged. In this talk, based on our experience building LITMUS^RT, I will first illustrate some of the major differences between theory and practice and their implications, and then survey and summarize some of the key results and observations that inform the current state of the art in multiprocessor RTOS design. Finally, I will highlight some of the most pressing open problems and shortcomings in current systems, and speculate on likely trends in the next decade of RTOS research.

About the speaker:

Björn Brandenburg is a tenure-track research group leader (a position equivalent to a US assistant professorship) at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems (MPI-SWS) in Kaiserslautern, Germany. He joined MPI-SWS in 2011 after obtaining his PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he worked under the direction of Jim Anderson on multiprocessor real-time systems. His research is focused on operating systems for predictable multiprocessor real-time systems and spans from the analytical foundations on the one hand, to practical systems and implementation issues on the other hand, with a special focus on real-time locking and scheduling. His dissertation work was recognized with three competitive dissertation awards (UNC Dean’s Distinguished Dissertation Award 2012, CGS/ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award 2012, EDAA Outstanding Dissertations Award 2012). Since 2007, he has (co-)authored more than 40 peer-reviewed papers, three of which were recognized with best-paper awards (RTSS, EMSOFT, SIES). He is the lead developer and maintainer of LITMUSRT (http://www.litmus-rt.org), a real-time extension of the Linux kernel that has been continuously maintained since 2006 and used in numerous published studies (8 PhD and Master's theses and more than 40 papers by groups in North & South America, Asia, and Europe).


 

Mary Backer: Stepping Stones to an Easier World

Abstract:

New technology brings us many wonders and also many frustrations and obstacles. In this talk I describe two mobile and wearable research projects that attempt to remove some of these obstacles in our daily lives. The first project, Mobius, tackles frustrations around authentication. Every day we must prove our right to access online sites and services, devices such as smart phones and PCs, and physical objects and infrastructure such as cars and doors. We performed a wearable digital diary study to gather information about people's authentication behavior, their likes and dislikes, and what does or doesn't work for them. Results indicate the feasibility of reducing the user authentication burden with a "universal authenticator'' — a wearable device that assumes the responsibility of authenticating its owner to restricted resources, both physical and virtual. Mobius is our prototype design of a universal authenticator in the form of a perpetually powered ring. The second project, the Sound of Silence, makes it easier to share content among and otherwise communicate with participants in an event like a formal meeting, a chance encounter, or a broadcast TV or radio program. We compare simple privacy-preserving "silence signatures" gathered on mobile devices to capture the dynamically changing group membership of such events. For both of these projects I'll describe what worked, what failed, and what we should worry about in the future.

About the speaker:

Mary Baker is a senior research scientist at HP Labs in Palo Alto. Her research interests include distributed systems, wearables, digital preservation, and mobile systems and applications. Baker received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley. Before working at HP, she ran the MosquitoNet mobile research group at Stanford University. She is a founding member of the IEEE Pervasive Computing editorial board and the SNIA technical working group focused on digital preservation.

 

Rajesh Gupta: Sense & Adapt: Our Evolving Models of Computing Machines up and down the Abstract Stack

Remark: This is a keynote from SBESC'15 and occurs after IESS, however, IESS participants are allowed to attend this keynote.

Abstract:

A modern computing system is an elaborate stack of hardware and software with stable intermediate points that enable a platform builder to construct all sorts of machines with 'commodity' hardware and software pieces. Unfortunately, this extraordinary flexibility comes at a huge cost: two to three orders of magnitude in efficiency and cost. This is far beyond the range of most engineered systems. This observation has been at the root of our quest for new architectures — from modifications to von Neumann to data-flow variants — and new ways of building/synthesizing hardware pieces for new machines — co-processors to synthesized accelerators. This talk pulls the most interesting and promising vectors of research in this line of thinking to outline a vision of emerging machines: that are engineered less but enabled more to sense and adapt the computation to the environment in which they are placed.

About the speaker:

Rajesh K. Gupta is a QUALCOMM professor in Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego. His research focus is on energy efficiency from algorithms, devices to systems that scale from IC chips, data centers to commercial buildings. His past contributions include SystemC modeling and SPARK parallelizing high-level synthesis, both of which have been incorporated into industrial practice. Earlier Gupta lead or co-lead DARPA-sponsored efforts under the Data Intensive Systems (DIS) and Power Aware Computing and Communications (PACC) programs on role of adaptation in energy efficient system architectures. His ongoing projects are focused on mitigating microelectronic variability and creating non-volatile storage/memory systems. In recent years, Gupta and his students have received a best paper award at IEEE/ACM DCOSS’08 and a best demonstration award at IEEE/ACM IPSN/SPOTS’05. Gupta received a BTech in EE from IIT Kanpur, MS in EECS from UC Berkeley and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. Gupta is a Fellow of the IEEE. Gupta serves as chair of Computer Science and as associate director of the Qualcomm Institute at UCSD.

 

Invited Talk

Edelweis Ritt: Embedded Systems in the Brazilian Smart Cities

Abstract:

Smart cities are generally seen as the gateway for sustainable urbanization. While concepts reach from intelligent instrumentation to electronic participation, they all have in common a tremendous potential to improve the efficiency of city management as well as the quality of urban living. The internet of things (IoT) embedded systems are key elements in the design of smart city solutions. Their interoperability and opportunities as an open platform will largely affect the rate of innovation and their availability will accelerate the transformation towards intelligent services. For South America, the topic smart city not only matters because of its high degree of urbanization but also because of the high affinity of its population for networked solutions. This panel will discuss the potential of embedded systems for smart cities In Brazil in the near future and the role Unitec.

About the speaker:

Edelweis Ritt has a broad, academic and business background in the electronics industry. At Agilent Germany she worked as production engineer and IC designer. She was involved in multi million transistor System-on-a-Chip developments and was also responsible for remote foundry management. Edelweis was with CEITEC  in Brazil since the very beginning. She was initially responsible for the Design Center  and later became COO for  CEITEC S.A. - a company with 6" Wafer FAB and more than 200 employees. At Semikron Brazil, Edelweis was General Manager for South America, responsible for a production facility for power electronics. Edelweis lectured at Universidade do Rio dos Sinos – Unisinos –  computer architecture and digital circuits. She was also lecturer at PUC-RS in Porto Alegre lecturing integrated circuits and IC design. Edelweis is currently Business Development Director at Unitec Semiconductors and responsible for the R&D department.